Food

For chewy Japanese noodles, borrow an Italian technique

Japanese udon noodles are all about the chew, but it’s hard to replicate the texture with the dry udon available in American markets. So the cooks at Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street found a solution in the Italian technique of cooking pasta only until al dente — or still quite firm. Chilling the noodles by rinsing them with ice in the strainer under cold water further firms up the texture. Even after you reheat the udon in the cooked sauce, they retain that pleasant toothsome quality. For the sauce, it’s a simple mixture of soy sauce, dried shiitake mushrooms and mirin, balanced by a little sugar. Fresh shiitake and mild-tasting baby bok choy keep the stir-fry light, and pickled ginger balances the savoriness.

JeanMarie Brownson: This homemade beef and broccoli stir-fry is take-out worthy

Make no mistake, weeknight cooking challenges everyone. To reduce stress, and the temptation for take-out burgers and fries, I stock ground beef and turkey in the freezer, onions and garlic on the counter, and rice noodles, interesting sauces and marinades in the pantry. The fridge usually boasts a member of the cabbage family, a bag of carrots and fresh limes.

The Kitchn: This is the quickest way to cook acorn squash

There are some days when you just don’t want to turn on the oven. Other days, the oven is occupied with other components for dinner. That’s why I love this method for cooking acorn squash in the microwave! It’s such an easy way to create a flavorful and fuss-free side dish in a matter of minutes.

Environmental Nutrition: Pump up the iron

Why is iron so crucial to our bodies? “We need adequate iron to produce hemoglobin and myoglobin, an essential part of red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body,” says Julie Stefanski, RDN, registered dietitian nutritionist and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.

6 tips for eating more mindfully

Instead of shoveling food into your mouth at your desk, mindful eating challenges you to slow down, take a break, and focus on the food in front of you.

Environmental Nutrition: Foods to fight constipation

If you’ve been feeling a little backed up, you’re not alone. Constipation is one of the leading gastrointestinal complaints in America — about 63 million people in the United States experience the condition, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Chances are most of us have experienced constipation, a condition that becomes more prevalent with advancing age.

Seriously Simple: Zucchini two ways

Zucchini, yellow or green, are one of late summer’ s gifts to us. There is always plenty available, and it can be used in myriad ways. These softer squashes can be sauteed and added to pastas, rice and egg dishes.